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Border patrol agents are stopping people on highways in New England to check their citizenship

Border patrol agents are stopping people on highways in New England to check their citizenship

(CNN) - Far from ground zero in the Trump administration's crackdown on illegal immigration along the southern border, US Customs and Border Protection checkpoints on highways in Maine and New Hampsh ... Continue Reading
Protesters briefly block bus leaving migrant detention center in Texas

Protesters briefly block bus leaving migrant detention center in Texas

MCALLEN, Texas (CNN) - Chanting protesters briefly blocked a bus leaving a migrant detention center in McAllen, Texas, on Saturday afternoon.

Protesters stood in front of the bus and yelled, "Set the children free" and "Shame on you" at Border Patrol officers. The Border Patrol ended up surrounding the bus so it could back up and go out the other end of the street.

CNN reporters could see children through the darkened windows, and a protester told CNN she also saw children through the windows. She said some of the children waved at her and she told them, "You are not alone" in Spanish.

"It was very difficult to see," said Denise Benavides of Dallas, who said she's a member of the League of United Latin American Citizens.

Benavides said she didn't know where the bus was going but "that's something we'll look into -- what's going on and where are they taking these children."

Uniformed officers arrived to calm the situation. McAllen police told CNN nobody was arrested.

The vehicle's destination was unclear.

A US Customs and Border Patrol spokesperson said the bus carried "family groups" being transferred into the custody of Immigration and Customs Enforcement. When asked about the bus's destination, an ICE spokesman recommended contacting Health & Human Services or CBP. HHS said to ask ICE.

Many of the at least 2,300 children separated from their undocumented parents since May are in far-flung shelters and foster homes nationwide -- hundreds of miles away from the southern border.

In many cases, the parents don't know where their children are being held, the parents' lawyers say.

On Wednesday, President Trump signed an executive order reversing his policy and allowing parents and their children to stay together.

US Rep. Jackie Speier, a Democrat from California, and other members of Congress toured the McAllen Customs Border Protection Facility on Saturday. She told CNN she's seen no evidence of a method to reunify parents and children.

"The staff at all the facilities are really operating with no policies," Speier said. "The President, you know, signs an executive order, and then washes his hands of it. That is unacceptable.

"This is on his watch. This is his process. This is his policy he put in place. If you're going to undo it, then you truly have to undo it by making sure that you match every child with every parent."

More than 1,100 immigrants -- including children -- were being held at McAllen when reporters were allowed inside on June 17.

Car drives through crowd protesting police killing of Antwon Rose in Pittsburgh

Car drives through crowd protesting police killing of Antwon Rose in Pittsburgh

PITTSBURGH (CNN) - Protesters angry over the death of an unarmed teen who was shot by police this week marched Friday for the third straight night down the streets of downtown Pittsburgh.

Four people were arrested as hundreds of demonstrators blocked streets, Allegheny County Police Superintendent Coleman McDonough said.

Police are looking for a black sedan that drove through the crowd late Friday, said Chris Togneri, the city spokesman. No injuries were reported, he said.

Protesters were near PNC Park, where fans were leaving a Pittsburgh Pirates baseball game, when the car drove through, CNN affiliate KDKA reported.

'How do you justify that?'

Antwon Rose, 17, was shot by an officer three times on Tuesday as he attempted to flee a car stopped by police. Rose was one of two passengers in the car, which matched the description of a vehicle that had been involved in an earlier shooting, Allegheny County Police said.

East Pittsburgh Police Officer Michael Rosfeld fired on Rose from behind, hitting him in three spots, police said.

The manner of Rose's death was listed as homicide, the Allegheny County Medical Examiner's Office said.

"Three shots in the back, how you justify that?" protesters chanted Friday.

Demonstrators carrying a sign that read, "Fire killer cops," led hundreds of supporters to the Homestead Grays Bridge, halting traffic for a few hours.

Those arrested face charges for failure to disperse and, at least one, for resisting arrest, McDonough told KDKA.

'He wasn't that boy'

Tia Taylor, who went to high school with Rose, addressed the crowd, offering a heartfelt testimony of him.

"He wasn't the person to be out here doing anything he didn't have no business doing. He wasn't that boy," Taylor, a student at Woodland Hills High School, said through tears.

Friday marked the third night of protests in Pittsburgh. Several groups since Wednesday have shut down highways and intersections across the city.

As it grew dark, police became more visible. Squad cars trailed the crowd, and officers in riot gear formed a tight line, holding batons and blocking protesters' way.

Rosfeld, the officer who shot Rose, had been sworn in to the East Pittsburgh police force just hours before the shooting, though he'd worked with other local departments for seven years, CNN affiliate WPXI reported. He has been placed on administrative leave, police have said.

Allegheny County District Attorney Stephen Zappala does not plan to refer the case to the Pennsylvania attorney general, despite calls for him to do so. Zappala's spokesman, Mike Manko, said in an emailed statement that "the major crimes investigative resources in Allegheny County are more than capable of handling any homicide case."

Teenager uses sign language to communicate with blind and deaf man during flight

Teenager uses sign language to communicate with blind and deaf man during flight

(CNN) - A 15-year-old is being widely praised for an act of kindness during a cross-country flight. Clara Daly was traveling with her mother Jane from Boston to Los Angeles on an Alaska Airlines f ... Continue Reading
Jogger detained for 2 weeks after accidentally crossing US border from Canada

Jogger detained for 2 weeks after accidentally crossing US border from Canada

(CNN) - A woman jogging along a beach accidentally crossed the US border from Canada, and ended up detained in Washington state.Cedella Roman, 19, was visiting her mother from France when she went ... Continue Reading
There were warning signs before Chester Bennington's suicide, the Linkin Park singer's widow says

There were warning signs before Chester Bennington's suicide, the Linkin Park singer's widow says

(CNN) - Now, nearly a year after Linkin Park lead singer Chester Bennington took his own life, it's clear to his widow that in the days before he died, there were warning signs."I am now more educ ... Continue Reading
Mom of cyberbullied teen Tyler Clementi says she considered killing herself after her son's suicide

Mom of cyberbullied teen Tyler Clementi says she considered killing herself after her son's suicide

(CNN) - Jane Clementi -- whose son, Tyler Clementi, died by suicide after getting bullied online -- says that after his death at age 18, she also considered suicide. When Tyler was a student at Ru ... Continue Reading
DNA on napkin used to crack 32-year-old cold case, police say

DNA on napkin used to crack 32-year-old cold case, police say

(CNN) - DNA evidence from a discarded restaurant napkin was used to identify a suspect in the slaying of a 12-year-old girl in 1986, police in Tacoma, Washington, said Friday.Gary Hartman, 66, was ... Continue Reading
Sessions isn't the first to 'textjack' the Bible. Here are five of the most misused scriptures

Sessions isn't the first to 'textjack' the Bible. Here are five of the most misused scriptures

(CNN) - The game was tied and there was no time left on the clock when Dina Disney stepped to the foul line. Tears welling in her eyes, the college senior sank two free throws to seal her school's f ... Continue Reading
New York terror attack suspect now facing total of 28 federal charges

New York terror attack suspect now facing total of 28 federal charges

(CNN) - The suspect in New York's deadliest terror attack since 9/11 was arraigned Friday on new charges -- six counts of attempted murder -- in addition to 22 charges filed earlier from the 2017 inc ... Continue Reading
9,000 barrels of bourbon fall in Kentucky distillery building collapse

9,000 barrels of bourbon fall in Kentucky distillery building collapse

(CNN) - Pardon bourbon lovers for crying in their beer after half of the barrels being aged at a Kentucky distillery building fell to the ground when part of the structure collapsed.About 9,000 st ... Continue Reading
America's poor becoming more destitute under Trump, UN report says

America's poor becoming more destitute under Trump, UN report says

ATLANTA (CNN) - Americans born into poverty are more likely than ever before to stay that way, according to a United Nations report on poverty and inequality in the US.

"The United States, one of the world's richest nations and the "land of opportunity," is fast becoming a champion of inequality," the report concluded.

The Trump administration has slammed the UN report, arguing the organization should instead focus on poverty in the third world.

US Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley said, "It is patently ridiculous for the United Nations to examine poverty in America."

The report, presented Thursday in Geneva, comes two days after Haley announced the US would withdraw from the UN Human Rights Council.

Haley's comment was in response to a letter from Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders and 18 other politicians calling on the US to "take action to reduce shameful levels of poverty across the country."

They agreed with the report's conclusion that the Trump administration's $1.5 trillion in tax cuts "overwhelmingly benefited the wealthy and worsened inequality."

Philip Alston, a New York University law and human rights professor, led a UN study traveling across US. The group went to Puerto Rico and Washington, D.C. Alabama, California, Georgia, West Virginia were among the states they visited.

"Most Americans don't care about it. They have bought the line peddled by conservative groups that poor people deserve what they are getting," Alston, the UN special rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights, told CNN.

The report notes that the US has highest child mortality rate of 20 rich countries (OPEC comparison). It also has among the highest child poverty rates in the developed world, at 21%. It also considered obesity rates, income inequality and incarceration rates.

Haley said the UN special rapporteur had "categorically misstated" the progress America had made reducing poverty, but she gave no examples.

Who are America's working poor?

More than 40 million Americans live in poverty, according to the US census.

Maudine Fall has spent her life working minimum wage jobs. At 56 years old, she became homeless. Although she continues cleaning and catering, she rarely gets more than 30 hours of work a week.

Occasionally, she stays in shelters, some nights she sleeps on the street. The worst part she says; you can never let your guard down.

"I worry about the danger, you put yourself in a vulnerable position when you're out here," she says.

Fall says it's impossible to save money for a rental deposit.

"You're never able to save, you're never able to really just build up and have a big deposit to put down. You're struggling, day by day. Even working," she says.

If you are among the working poor living pay check to pay check, one illness or natural disaster can put you on the street.

John Bobbit is one such man.

He used to own a maintenance business employing four people.

That all changed after Hurricane Katrina slammed into New Orleans in 2005. He lost everything and ended up homeless for almost a decade.

"Pride was my biggest sin because I wouldn't ask people to help me. I always thought, 'I'm on my own, I've got to do this on my own.' I turned to drugs and alcohol just out of self-pity, and I ended up digging myself into a deeper hole," Bobbit said.

He was at rock bottom when he decided to walk some 500 miles (more than 700kms) from New Orleans to Atlanta to start anew. It took him 32 days.

Safehouse Outreach in downtown Atlanta helped him find work in a major hotel.

"I was in a job program and they started me off at $8.50. It's the most humble I've ever been in my life and I'm 50 years old. I'm used to making $25-30 an hour when I ran my own business."

He was quickly promoted to a manager position but was out of work 18 months later when illness struck.

Respiratory failure, cellulitis and gout meant five weeks in hospital and many more weeks recovering. The hotel could not hold his position.

Bobbit returned to Safehouse Outreach first as a volunteer and then he was hired as the kitchen manager.

Today he's making grilled cheese sandwiches and soup for the hundreds of people who struggle to survive on minimum wage.

"We do a free, hot healthy meal to anybody who walks in the door. That's lunch and dinner. In a given year, we'll see about 4,000 people," said Safehouse Outreach CEO Josh Bray.

The underemployed

The official unemployment rate might be at record lows, but Safehouse Outreach says it's seeing an increase in the number of underemployed.

Nolan English runs the outreach program.

"At least 40% of the people we serve are working, they're holding down two to three jobs, have children, they may be trying to land on someone's couch, some live in abandoned buildings, in their cars, then they come here and they go on shift, they work," he said.

Demetrius Philips and his wife, Shamika Harper, both are minimum wage workers who are homeless.

At 38 years, Philips earns just $8 hour.

"You might work today, might not tomorrow, which puts you in a bind because you're only making $40-50 maybe $60 a day. So pay for a hotel room and buy something to eat, you don't have any more money."

Across the US, people working for tips can often earn as little as $2.13 an hour and have to make up the rest in tips to meet the federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour.

"They're not livable wages, they're little tokens they're throwing, they're crumbs from your table," English said.

The Obama administration pushed to raise the minimum wage from $7.25 to $10.10 an hour in 2014, but Republicans blocked the bill despite overwhelming support for the measure.

What is absolute poverty?

More than 5 million Americans live in third world conditions also known as "absolute poverty," according to the report.

In Lowndes County, Alabama, the report found residents lacked basic sewage systems. Unable to afford a septic tank some people constructed their own homemade sewerage lines using PVC piping.

The UN study also found 19 out of 55 people tested in Alabama had hookworm. It's a disease typically found in developing countries, one that was thought to have been eradicated in the US in the 1980s.

While the issue is not new, the problem is becoming more dire under the Trump administration according to the UN.

It found Trump's policies seem "deliberately designed to remove the basic protections from the poorest, punish those who are not in employment and make even basic health care into a privilege to be earned rather than a right of citizenship."

"Contempt for the poor in US drives cruel policies," Alston, the UN Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights, told CNN.

"The Trump administration has brought in massive tax breaks for corporations and the very wealthy, while orchestrating a systematic assault on the welfare system," he said. "The strategy seems to be tailor-made to maximize inequality and to plunge millions of working Americans, and those unable to work, into penury.

Forty-six million Americans depend on food banks, which is 30% above 2007 levels, according to Feeding America.

"Even people who are working full time can't afford a decent living. They do need food stamps. They do need the sort of assistance that government can provide, but instead what we see is a constant cut back in all of those benefits by this administration," Alston said.

1964 Civil Rights Act Fast Facts

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(CNN) - Here is a look at the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Considered the nation's most important civil rights legislation since Reconstruction (1865-1877), it prohibited discrimination on the basis of rac ... Continue Reading
Melania Trump Fast Facts

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(CNN) - Here is a look at the life of Melania Trump, wife of 45th US President Donald Trump.Personal:Birth date: April 26, 1970Birth place: Novo Mesto, Yugoslavia (now Slovenia)Birth name: ... Continue Reading
DNA testing revealed a WWII veteran stole an 8-year-old's identity. No one knows why

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(CNN) - He was a WWII veteran with a Purple Heart, a wife and three children. But in 1964, he vanished, moved across the country and later took the identity of an 8-year-old boy who had died years be ... Continue Reading
Face-scanning technology at Orlando airport expands to all international travelers

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T-shirt makers riff on Melania Trump's jacket with their own message and donate proceeds to refugee services

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(CNN) - First lady Melania Trump caused quite the stir with her "I Really Don't Care" jacket. Now, clothing companies are selling T-shirts that are inspired by the jacket but tout an opposite mess ... Continue Reading
El Paso's Republican mayor slams Trump on Mexico

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(CNN) - The reality of life on the US-Mexico border is not what President Trump is describing from Washington, according to the mayor of El Paso, Texas.Dee Margo, a Republican, said there's a vibr ... Continue Reading
They spoke out against immigrants. So she unearthed their own immigrant ancestors

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These are the distant states where migrant children are being sent

These are the distant states where migrant children are being sent

(CNN) - Hundreds of migrant children forcibly separated from their parents were transferred thousands of miles away from the border, and some already have been placed in foster care, officials said.

After crossing from the south, some children were taken to facilities along the border, including a new temporary shelter in Tornillo, Texas, while others headed to facilities as far away as New York.

Locations are chosen for a variety of reasons, said a spokesman for the Department of Health and Human Services. They include space availability, accommodations, demographics of the children and proximity to potential sponsors.

"There's an effort to place them as closely as possible to where they're going to be eventually reunified with a sponsor or a family member," he said.

He added it is "pretty rare" someone would go to New York, for instance, only because of space. It would probably be because an immediate family member is in the New York facility, the spokesman explained.

Without a publicly accessible database to track children, lawyers and case workers are determining locations probably by pulling state licenses and going shelter by shelter to figure it out, the spokesman said.

"How they move through these systems is largely space available and resources," said David Thronson, Michigan State University law professor and co-founder of the Immigration Law Clinic.

President Donald Trump has reversed a policy that resulted in the separation of 2,300 children from their parents, but it's unclear if or how those children will be reunited with their parents.

HHS has more than 100 shelters in 17 states to house unaccompanied children. Some of those facilities already are helping children who were separated from their families.

Federal authorities have been tight-lipped about where exactly all the children are held, but here are a few states where they have been sent.

Florida

The Homestead Temporary Shelter for Unaccompanied Children in Florida is a former Job Corps site that has been used as a shelter for unaccompanied minors since 2014. Photos taken this week showed boys and girls at the shelter.

On Tuesday, Florida Gov. Rick Scott sent a letter to HHS Secretary Alex Azar expressing concern over "unconfirmed reports" that the shelter is "potentially holding children who have been forcibly removed from their families."

In his letter, Scott demanded confirmation of reports that children separated from their families were being sent to the Homestead shelter. He also requested information about health screening protocols at the border and what, if any, health and education resources were being provided to children placed in Florida.

Michigan

Children as young as 3 months old have been transferred to facilities in Michigan, according to the state's Department of Civil Rights.

"We have received reports and are very concerned that the children arriving here are much younger than those who have been transported here in the past," said Agustin V. Arbulu, executive director of the Department of Civil Rights.

At least 81 children have arrived in Grand Rapids since April, CNN affiliate WXMI reported.

Dona Abbott, director of refugee and foster care programs with Bethany Christian Services, said the children are in temporary foster care homes and group placements across the state.

Arbulu called the separation of families a federal issue but said his department is monitoring the situation because it "has a duty to make sure their civil rights are protected."

"While we commend the work of resettlement agencies in Michigan attempting to serve these children with dignity and compassion, nothing can replace the love, sense of security and care of a parent," he said.

New York

Hundreds of migrant children, including a 9-month-old, have been taken to New York since the practice of separating families began, Mayor Bill de Blasio said.

At least 239 children are in the care of the Cayuga Centers in Harlem, which runs day programs for them. Some are in foster care, and others could be with relatives.

De Blasio said some of the children have bed bugs, lice, chicken pox and other contagious diseases. Some are too young to communicate and need significant mental health services.

"And this is just one of the centers in New York City," de Blasio said.

It's unclear how many separated children are in the city.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said his office is aware of more than 70 immigrant children in federal shelters in New York. Cuomo plans to sue "to protect the health and well-being of children" held in New York and elsewhere, he said in a statement.

South Carolina

Five migrant children have arrived in South Carolina since last month.

The children are ages 7 to 11, and most will be placed in foster care in the Columbia area, CNN affiliate WCIV reported.

"They don't understand what's happening, or why they have been separated from their parents," said Rebecca Gibson, a program coordinator for transitional foster care with Lutheran Services Carolinas. "The children don't know if they will be safe. They don't know where their parents are, and no one has given them any information."

Gibson said only one child has been released to a sponsor in the United States.

"We don't know the circumstances of how the separation happened, or if the children were able to say goodbye," she said.

Texas

Most infants and children are being held at new and old facilities in several cities, including McAllen, Tornillo and Brownsville, after they cross into the United States.

Some children under 13 are staying at newly built facilities such as a former private home about 20 miles from the US-Mexico border in the town of Combes, operated by Southwest Key Programs.

Democratic US Rep. Filemon Vela Jr. of Texas said he toured a new shelter in Brownsville, where about 40 children under 10 are staying.

One room held four infants, two of whom were accompanied by their teenage mothers, he said. The children receive constant attention, Vela said. "People are doing what they can under the circumstances."

Virginia

One facility for the children is in Bristow, more than 30 miles from the nation's capital. Youth for Tomorrow, a nonprofit founded by former Washington Redskins coach Joe Gibbs, has been partially used as a shelter for unaccompanied minors for several years.

Photos released this week by HHS showed girls wearing uniforms sitting in an auditorium, a set of baby high chairs, a room with cribs and a woman carrying a baby.

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