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UN Ambassador Nikki Haley resigns

UN Ambassador Nikki Haley resigns

(CNN) - US Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley resigned Tuesday directly to President Donald Trump, according to multiple sources familiar with her decision.A senior State Department offi ... Continue Reading
URGENT - UN Ambassador Nikki Haley resigns

URGENT - UN Ambassador Nikki Haley resigns

(CNN) -- US Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley resigned Tuesday directly to President Donald Trump, according to a source familiar with her decision.
Clinton: 'You cannot be civil with a political party that wants to destroy what you stand for'

Clinton: 'You cannot be civil with a political party that wants to destroy what you stand for'

WASHINGTON (CNN) - Hillary Clinton said Tuesday that civility in America can only begin again if Democrats win back the House or Senate this fall."You cannot be civil with a political party that wa ... Continue Reading
Clinton says Trump remarks at Kavanaugh swearing-in undermine Supreme Court

Clinton says Trump remarks at Kavanaugh swearing-in undermine Supreme Court

(CNN) - Hillary Clinton said Tuesday that President Donald Trump staged a "political rally" at Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh's ceremonial swearing-in that "further undermined the image and integrity of the court."

"What was done last night in the White House was a political rally. It further undermined the image and integrity of the court," Clinton, Trump's Democratic 2016 election opponent, told CNN's Christiane Amanpour in an exclusive interview.

"And that troubles me greatly. It saddens me. Because our judicial system has been viewed as one of the main pillars of our constitutional government. So I don't know how people are going to react to it. I think, given our divides, it will pretty much fall predictably between those who are for and those who are against," Clinton said.

"But the President's been true to form," she continued. "He has insulted, attacked, demeaned women throughout the campaign --- really for many years leading up to the campaign. And he's continued to do that inside the White House."

When Trump hosted Kavanaugh and his family at a ceremonial swearing-in at the White House on Monday night, he apologized "on behalf of our nation" to the newly minted justice for the difficult confirmation process.

"On behalf of our nation, I want to apologize to Brett and the entire Kavanaugh family for the terrible pain and suffering you have been forced to endure," Trump said. "Those who step forward to serve our country deserve a fair and dignified evaluation. Not a campaign of political and personal destruction based on lies and deception. What happened to the Kavanaugh family violates every notion of fairness, decency and due process."

Democrats must be tougher, Clinton says

Just days after Democrats lost their bitter fight to keep Kavanaugh off the high court, Clinton told Amanpour that her husband, former President Bill Clinton, thinks that "Democrats have to be tougher."

"Bill had to be incredibly strong -- first to get elected, then to get re-elected and to survive. And it was not easy by any means, obviously. But he really believes that Democrats have to be tougher," she said, adding that he also thinks the party will "have to stand up to the bullying and intimidation" from Republicans.

Clinton told Amanpour that she thinks that in the future her husband will "have things to say about his own experience and how it applies here."

The former President has previously been vocal about his views on Trump's presidency. In June, he said impeachment hearings would have begun if a Democratic president, instead of Trump, were in power and the Russia investigation was as far along as it was at that time. Clinton himself was impeached in 1998 by the House, but the Senate acquitted him, preventing his removal from office.

The former secretary of state also told Amanpour that Democrats need to draw a hard line against Republicans.

"You cannot be civil with a political party that wants to destroy what you stand for, what you care about," she said. "That's why I believe, if we are fortunate enough to win back the House and or the Senate, that's when civility can start again."

"But until then, the only thing Republicans seem to recognize is strength," she said.

Hollywood director teases Cruz over toughness in new ad

Hollywood director teases Cruz over toughness in new ad

WASHINGTON (CNN) - A new political attack ad in the US Senate race in Texas from a famed filmmaker suggests that Ted Cruz should have taken President Donald Trump "out by the woodshed" if he wanted to ... Continue Reading
Kanye West is headed to the White House

Kanye West is headed to the White House

(CNN) - Kanye West will meet with President Donald Trump and his son-in-law Jared Kushner at the White House on Thursday.West will have lunch with the President at the White House and meet with Ku ... Continue Reading
Jamal Khashoggi: Trump 'concerned' about missing journalist; Saudis deny involvement

Jamal Khashoggi: Trump 'concerned' about missing journalist; Saudis deny involvement

WASHINGTON (CNN) - President Donald Trump said Monday that he was "concerned" about reports on the disappearance of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, a Washington Post writer and Saudi royal court insider-turned-critic.

"I am concerned about that," Trump said. "I don't like hearing about it and hopefully that will sort itself out. Right now, nobody knows anything about it."

"There's some pretty bad stories about it. I do not like it," he added.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo echoed his comments in a statement late Wednesday, saying there were "conflicting reports," but that the US was "concerned" by Khashoggi's disappearance.

"We call on the government of Saudi Arabia to support a thorough investigation of Mr. Khashoggi's disappearance and to be transparent about the results of that investigation," Pompeo said.

'Absolutely false'

Trump's comments coincided with a vehement denial from Saudi Arabia's ambassador to the US, Prince Khalid bin Salman bin Abdulaziz, who said claims that Khashoggi had been killed or detained by Saudi authorities were "absolutely false, and baseless," according to a statement obtained by CNN.

"There are many facts regarding his whereabouts that will hopefully be revealed through the ongoing investigation. Despite that, we have seen over the last few days various malicious leaks and grim rumors flying around about Jamal's whereabouts and fate," the statement says.

"I assure you that the reports that suggest that Jamal Khashoggi went missing in the Consulate in Istanbul or that the Kingdom's authorities have detained him or killed him are absolutely false, and baseless," it notes.

Vice President Mike Pence also weighed in on Khashoggi's disappearance, saying on Twitter, "Deeply troubled to hear reports about Saudi Arabian journalist Jamal Khashoggi. If true, this is a tragic day. Violence against journalists across the globe is a threat to freedom of the press & human rights. The free world deserves answers."

It was the first time Trump has weighed in on the situation involving Khashoggi, who was last seen entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul last Tuesday.

CNN on Tuesday obtained an image from a security camera of Khashoggi entering the building on October 2 at 1:14 p.m. local time.

Earlier on Monday, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said Saudi Arabia should prove that Khashoggi has, in fact, left the Saudi consulate in Istanbul.

"He entered the general consulate himself, and if he has entered by himself and if he did not exit it, of course this should be proven by the general consulate," Erdogan said at a news conference in Budapest.

Erdogan said the Saudi consulate should have surveillance cameras and should be able to show the video of Khashoggi leaving the building. He mentioned that there are no documents or other evidence that show the journalist departing.

Turkish officials told The Washington Post and Reuters on Saturday that Khashoggi was killed inside the consulate. The officials have so far provided no evidence or details on how they arrived at this conclusion.

"I am following it up as the President of the Turkish Republic," Erdogan told reporters in Ankara on Sunday, while confirming that he had known Khashoggi for some time and considered him a friend.

The Justice Ministry and the chief prosecutor in Istanbul "started an investigation and efforts are continuing," Erdogan said. Airport entrances and exits are being investigated.

"At the moment there are certain people who arrived from Saudi Arabia. And our chief investigator is investigating everything in this matter."

No surveillance footage

Khashoggi, who left Saudia Arabia in 2017, entered the consulate last Tuesday to obtain documents for his upcoming marriage while his Turkish fiancée waited outside. She says she never saw him re-emerge.

A Saudi official said Khashoggi left the consulate shortly after he visited. The Saudis did not, however, release any surveillance footage or other evidence.

CNN reported Sunday that the US government is quietly working Khashoggi's case across several agencies and at senior levels of the administration.

Two senior administration officials said the administration has no verifiable information to confirm the Turkish government claims that Khashoggi was killed but that the US is seeking answers about his whereabouts -- and talking to senior levels of Saudi government.

In his statement to CNN, Saudi Arabia's ambassador to the US said Saudi investigators are working with Turkish authorities to determine what happened to Khashoggi.

"Jamal is a Saudi citizen whose safety and security is a top priority for the Kingdom, just as is the case with any other citizen. We will not spare any effort to locate him, just as we would if it were any other Saudi citizen," it said.

The incident has put into sharp focus Saudi Arabia's young Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman's perceived crackdown on dissidents, his kingdom's delicate relationship with Turkey and Khashoggi 's influence within the royal court.

URGENT - Clinton says Trump remarks at Kavanaugh swearing-in undermine Supreme Court

URGENT - Clinton says Trump remarks at Kavanaugh swearing-in undermine Supreme Court

(CNN) -- Hillary Clinton said Tuesday that President Donald Trump staged a "political rally" at Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh's ceremonial swearing-in that "further undermined the image and integrity of the court.""What was done last night in the White House was a political rally. It further undermined the image and integrity of the court," Clinton, Trump's Democratic 2016 election opponent, told CNN's Christiane Amanpour in an exclusive interview.
Trump rips up the trade playbook to take on China

Trump rips up the trade playbook to take on China

BALI, Indonesia (CNN) - President Donald Trump wants a deal with China --- just not anytime soon.After announcing a revamped trade agreement with Canada and Mexico last week, Trump reeled off a lis ... Continue Reading
Bernie Sanders will hit Iowa and South Carolina in 9-state midterm campaign blitz

Bernie Sanders will hit Iowa and South Carolina in 9-state midterm campaign blitz

(CNN) - Sen. Bernie Sanders will campaign for Democratic candidates across the country this month at more than 15 planned events in nine states -- including a number of presidential primary hot spots ... Continue Reading
There is still a huge divide on gender roles in the US

There is still a huge divide on gender roles in the US

(CNN) - For many women, the confirmation of new Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh has been a shattering event. But the high-pressure confrontation may have shattered nothing as much as the myth o ... Continue Reading
Kavanaugh's confirmation fires up progressives ahead of midterms

Kavanaugh's confirmation fires up progressives ahead of midterms

(CNN) - A crowdfunding campaign that aims to punish Maine Sen. Susan Collins for her vote to confirm Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court has collected more than $4 million for her eventual opponent ... Continue Reading
Kavanaugh settles in, hires 4 female clerks, prepares for first day of arguments

Kavanaugh settles in, hires 4 female clerks, prepares for first day of arguments

WASHINGTON (CNN) - Justice Brett Kavanaugh, fresh off a confirmation process that featured one of the most polarizing and politicized hearings in modern times, will take the bench on Tuesday for the s ... Continue Reading
Women are angry at Trump and his party. And it's not just about Kavanaugh

Women are angry at Trump and his party. And it's not just about Kavanaugh

SANTA CLARITA, California (CNN) - On a recent evening in the suburbs of Los Angeles, two dozen women gathered to talk about sexual assault.They did so at the campaign office of Katie Hill, a Democr ... Continue Reading
Stormy Daniels on Michael Cohen: 'I guess I forgive him'

Stormy Daniels on Michael Cohen: 'I guess I forgive him'

WASHINGTON (CNN) - Stormy Daniels said Monday her feelings toward Michael Cohen have softened after he admitted to working with President Donald Trump to keep her silent about their alleged affair, sa ... Continue Reading
Trump says he has no plans to fire Rosenstein

Trump says he has no plans to fire Rosenstein

WASHINGTON (CNN) - President Donald Trump said Monday he has no plans to fire Rod Rosenstein, the deputy attorney general who has been facing an uncertain fate for more than two weeks.

"No, I don't. No," Trump told reporters on Monday after he was asked if he has any plans to fire Rosenstein.

Rosenstein joined Trump aboard Air Force One for a trip to Florida, where the two men attended the International Association of Chiefs of Police's annual convention.

"Thank you as well to our Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein for being here, flew down together," Trump said at the event. "The press wants to know, 'What did you talk about?' 'We had a very good talk,' I will say. That became a very big story, actually. We had a good talk."

On Monday night, Rosenstein attended the ceremonial swearing-in of Justice Brett Kavanaugh at the White House, where he did not respond to CNN's questions about how his conversation with Trump earlier in the day had gone.

Trump and Rosenstein had been scheduled to meet last week to discuss The New York Times report that flung Rosenstein into limbo. The report claimed Rosenstein discussed secretly recording Trump and using the 25th Amendment to remove him from office. They postponed the meeting amid the Kavanaugh confirmation battle and speculation has abounded that Trump might fire Rosenstein.

Rosenstein said he never pursued recording the President and denied any suggestion he advocated for Trump's removal.

After Trump arrived back at the White House Monday, he told reporters, "Yeah, I'm not doing anything. I'm not making any changes."

White House spokesman Hogan Gidley later said Trump and Rosenstein "met for about 45 minutes aboard Air Force One," but did not say whether the two discussed the Times report.

"The President and Deputy Attorney General, Rod Rosenstein, met for about 45 minutes aboard Air Force One. They discussed various topics including the International Chiefs of Police event later today, support for our great law enforcement officials, border security, how to better address violent crime in Chicago and general DOJ business," Gidley said in a statement.

Trump said earlier Monday that the two men would be "talking on the plane" and said he looks "forward to being with him."

"That'll be very nice," Trump said. "I actually have a good relationship other than there's no collusion."

Pressed further about his relationship with Rosenstein, Trump added: "I didn't know Rod before, but I got to know him and I get along very well with him."

After the Times report published, Rosenstein told White House chief of staff John Kelly he would resign, anticipating the article would enrage Trump and he would be fired. But when he showed up at the White House last Monday to meet with Kelly, he left the meeting unscathed.

Trump had previously indicated he would prefer to keep Rosenstein in his post, but offered no definitive indication of Rosenstein's fate until his comments on Monday morning.

Heidi Heitkamp was ready to vote 'yes' on Kavanaugh. Then she watched him with the sound off.

Heidi Heitkamp was ready to vote 'yes' on Kavanaugh. Then she watched him with the sound off.

BISMARCK, North Dakota (CNN) - Sen. Heidi Heitkamp was ready to vote 'yes' on Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.Having been just one of three Democratic senators to vote to confirm President Do ... Continue Reading
Trump apologizes to Kavanaugh for sexual misconduct allegations during confirmation

Trump apologizes to Kavanaugh for sexual misconduct allegations during confirmation

WASHINGTON (CNN) - President Donald Trump apologized to Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh for "the terrible pain and suffering" he and his family were "forced to endure" during his confirmation process, at a ceremonial swearing-in event at the White House on Monday evening.

"Those who step forward to serve our country deserve a fair and dignified evaluation, not a campaign of political and personal destruction based on lies and deception," Trump said.

"What happened to the Kavanaugh family violates every notion of fairness, decency and due process," the President continued.

Trump said a man or woman in this country "must always be presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty."

"You, sir, under historic scrutiny, were proven innocent," Trump said to Kavanaugh. The FBI probe into the allegations against Kavanaugh reportedly found no corroboration of the allegations against him but was criticized by Democrats for not being a full investigation.

The ceremony took place in the East Room -- the same location where the President first announced Kavanaugh's nomination 13 weeks ago. Every sitting member of the Supreme Court was present at the ceremony.

Kavanaugh was confirmed by the Senate on Saturday, earning 50 "yes" votes -- the fewest for any Supreme Court justice in the modern era. The process was marred accusations of sexual assault and misconduct dredged up weeks before senators cast their votes. He denied all the allegations.

In his speech at the ceremony, Kavanaugh said the emotional Senate confirmation process "tested" him, "but it did not change me. My approach to judging remains the same."

Kavanaugh emphasized he will be an "independent" and "impartial" justice on the nation's highest court. "The Supreme Court is an institution of law -- it is not a partisan or political institution. The justices do not sit on opposite sides of an aisle."

"The Senate confirmation process was contentious and emotional," Kavanaugh said. "That process is over. My focus now is to be the best justice I can be."

"I take this office with gratitude and no bitterness. On the Supreme Court I will seek to be a force for stability and unity."

Kavanaugh also noted the first group of clerks he's hired as a justice are all women, a first in the history of the Supreme Court.

Earlier Monday, Trump claimed the accusations against Kavanaugh were a "hoax set up by the Democrats." He also blamed "evil" people for putting Kavanaugh in a "disgraceful situation" during his confirmation process. The President had at one point previously been conciliatory toward Christine Blasey Ford, who testified before Congress alleging that Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her. Trump, at the time of the testimony, called Ford a "good witness" and said he respected her position very much.

Kavanaugh was administered the official Constitutional Oath and Judicial Oath by Chief Justice John Roberts and retired Justice Anthony Kennedy shortly after being confirmed by the Senate.

The latest justice to join the bench, Neil Gorsuch, spoke last year during his swearing-in at the White House Rose Garden. Justice Samuel Alito spoke at his swearing-in as well. However, Justices Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan did not offer remarks during their respective swearing-in ceremonies, opting, instead, to speak at receptions with then-President Barack Obama regarding their appointments.

Trump calls Kavanaugh accusations a 'hoax set up by the Democrats'

Trump calls Kavanaugh accusations a 'hoax set up by the Democrats'

WASHINGTON (CNN) - President Donald Trump on Monday claimed Brett Kavanaugh's Supreme Court nomination was "caught up in a hoax set up by the Democrats."

"The things they said about him, I don't even think he ever heard of the words. It was all made up. It was fabricated and it's a disgrace and I think it's gonna really show you something come November 6th," Trump said as he left the White House for an event in Orlando.

When Trump hosted Kavanaugh and his family at a ceremonial swearing-in at the White House on Monday night, he apologized to the newly minted justice for the difficult confirmation process.

"On behalf of our nation, I want to apologize to Brett and the entire Kavanaugh family for the terrible pain and suffering you have been forced to endure," the President said. "Those who step forward to serve our country deserve a fair and dignified evaluation. Not a campaign of political and personal destruction based on lies and deception. What happened to the Kavanaugh family violates every notion of fairness, decency and due process.

"Our country, a man or a woman, must always be presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty. And with that I must state that you, sir, under historic scrutiny were proven innocent. Thank you."

Kavanaugh won Senate confirmation over the weekend, earning 50 "yes" votes -- the fewest ever for any Supreme Court justice in the modern era.

He was accused of sexual assault and misconduct in the weeks before senators took their votes. He denied all the allegations.

Trump had previously been conciliatory toward Christine Blasey Ford, who accused Kavanaugh of sexual assault, calling her a "good witness" and saying he respected her position very much.

"With all of that you cannot say that we've done anything but be respectful, and I do. I respect her position very much. I respect her position very much," Trump had said to reporters.

But Monday, Trump said the Democrats "tortured" Kavanaugh and his family over the accusations.

"I thought that the way they conducted themselves, the way they dealt with a high-level, brilliant -- going to be a great justice of the Supreme Court -- the way they really tortured him and his family I thought it was disgrace. I thought it was one of the most disgraceful performances I've ever seen," Trump said Monday morning.

Monday afternoon, during an address at a law enforcement conference, Trump blamed "evil" people for putting Kavanaugh in a "disgraceful situation" during his confirmation process.

"He's a great person and it was very, very unfair what happened to him. False charges, false accusations, horrible statements that were totally untrue that he knew nothing about," Trump said. "It was a disgraceful situation, brought about by people that are evil and he toughed it out."

The President lauded Kavanaugh, saying he "will be a faithful defender of the rule of law."

Trump had previously mocked Ford's testimony about the alleged assault, and Monday's comments continued the pattern of disbelieving her.

During the 2016 presidential campaign, at least 13 women accused Trump of misbehavior ranging from sexual harassment to sexual assault. They came forward in the wake of a 2005 "Access Hollywood" tape that was released in October 2016 in which he is caught saying on a hot mic: "And when you're a star, they let you do it. You can do anything. ... Grab them by the p***y. You can do anything."

The White House -- through press secretary Sarah Sanders and others -- has dismissed all the allegations against him as old news that had been litigated during the campaign.

The President has also voiced suspicion about the year-old #MeToo movement, complaining that allegations made decades later can ruin a man's life. He has questioned why women wait so long to come forward if they are telling the truth. Last week, he expressed concern for men in this moment.

"It is a very scary time for young men in America, where you can be guilty of something you may not be guilty of," Trump told reporters. "This is a very, very -- this is a very difficult time. What's happening here has much more to do than even the appointment of a Supreme Court justice."

CNN's Maegan Vazquez and Jeremy Diamond contributed to this report.

URGENT - Trump apologizes to Kavanaugh for sexual misconduct allegations during confirmation

URGENT - Trump apologizes to Kavanaugh for sexual misconduct allegations during confirmation

(CNN) -- President Donald Trump apologized to Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh for "the terrible pain and suffering" he and his family were "forced to endure" during his confirmation process, at a ceremonial swearing-in event at the White House on Monday evening."Those who step forward to serve our country deserve a fair and dignified evaluation, not a campaign of political and personal destruction based on lies and deception," Trump said."What happened to the Kavanaugh family violates every notion of fairness, decency and due process," the President continued.Trump said a man or woman in this country "must always be presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.""You, sir, under historic scrutiny, were proven innocent," Trump said to Kavanaugh. The FBI probe into the allegations against Kavanaugh reportedly found no corroboration of the allegations against him but was criticized by Democrats for not being a full investigation.

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